Ok, this is just way too awesome to not be posted. It’s like Interstellar, but without the narrative or humans. I suggest you put this on full screen and make sure you have your sound on – soundtrack choice is amazing. Thank you for the experience Julius Horsthuis.

Dezeen published an article yesterday with Jony Ive saying that “Design Education is ‘tragic'”. Related to Ive speaking at the London Design Museum recently, the top part of the article is alright, but what I found much more informative was the lower portion, where they give some “edited highlights” from his speech, containing some invaluable general advice for designers. You can find the article here. Much recommended!

An absolutely awesome talk about algorithms and how they shape our world by Kevin Slavin on TED.

Especially fascinating to me is how Kevin goes over exactly the things I was discussing in my thesis starting at 8:45 into the talk – the influence of computing on culture, the relation of our modern culture and algorithms, and finally – the trend to put data centers into cities because, financially, it makes so much sense!

Check out Kevin’s talk on TED by clicking on the image below.

Click on the image to watch the talk on TED

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Quant E-Sportlimousine, by Nanoflowcell

Something interesting: Dezeen is writing about a Salt water-powered electric car approved for roads in Europe. Let’s hope this vehicle is a real thing and not some hoax – looks a little like an over-sell..

“… The presumption of the Gods of The Market is that we passively crave, above all else, the accessible, the approachable, the unchallenging, the bland, the readily legible. It is, I suspect, its very subjection to an unrelenting diet of these base qualities that has prompted a generation to decline saccharine architecture, fast-food architecture, “eezee-lisnin” architecture, instant gratification architecture in favour of the grown-up’s architecture of getting on for half a century ago.

There was good Brutalism and bad. But even the bad was done in earnest. It took itself seriously, which is a crime in The Market whose insistence is on mindless fun and moronic fun…”

Jonathan Meades (15.09.2014), “There was good brutalism and bad, but even the bad was done in earnest”. Dezeen (read the full article)

Seemed worth sharing..

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“Son of a b*tch..!”

You know that feeling when you know that what you just witnessed was an act of genius? That feeling you get when seeing how simple yet powerful something is that you wonder how come you haven’t come up with it yourself, but yet you haven’t? The feeling of awe mixed with disappointment?

During my recent visit to the Netherlands, I went to Rotterdam – my architectural birth place, as I call it – to see how and if the city has changed since the last time I’ve been there (internship with Erick van Egeraat back in 2008). One of the things – or buildings, to be precise – I wanted to see was, obviously, OMA’s De Rottedam. And I have to say – I was quite impressed.

Honestly, looking at it from across the river Maas, it didn’t seem all that special. The parti – shifted blocks – was clear to the point it was bland. However, as I started crossing the Erasmus bridge, getting closer to the structure, it started to speak. For all the talk of “Manhattan on Maas”, I have to say – this building actually did it: it is a true piece of Manhattan, but a surreal one – which makes it that much cooler.

All of us probably remember the cover for the later edition of “Delirious New York” – the picture of the facades of the Rockefeller Center extension on 6th avenue. Well, De Rotterdam is the clone of those buildings, only made 3-dimensional. The facade’s and parti’s blandness start working magic when you are at mid-range: from far it’s nothing but a stupid vertical pattern and a few blocks, from close the detailing isn’t great (as is almost common with OMA’s buildings). But mid-range – that’s when it makes you dizzy as the building starts seemingly mirroring, multiplying and overlaying itself. The building is almost fractal being big, but small, but big still (definitely huge for R’dam’s scape). The sequence of interior spaces in the public part of the building is classical Koolhaas: a meeting room suspended over a parking garage which looks “honestly” right into the atrium – not a “filthy” pragmatic “support” space, tucked away somewhere no one can see it, but a space in its own right, totally worthy of being shown off as a luxury. It is all a little too grey, and a little too stark, and a little too Rotterdam, but damn, does it work!

Now, I do have to say that I only visited the “public” part of the building. I did not visit any offices or apartments. I am sure critics will find there’s plenty wrong with them. I do not know that, and can’t judge or tell you anything about them. However, what I did see – I loved.

Good job, Mr. K. and Co. Loved it.

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When I was in school, I remember our professors telling us that only about 10% of the people educated to be architects will actually end up being architects. I never really understood how that can be, but already now it seems to be true. Out of all my ex-classmates, few are actually practicing architecture. Instead, they tend to focus on auxiliary fields, related, but not strictly speaking architectural. A couple folks have started a joint CAM outfit, 3D-printing objects, laser-cutting models and such. Another couple of people I know started rendering businesses. Others focused on code and architecture, programming presentations and digital models, or doing spatial installations. A good number switched to interior design. And all that in addition to countless people I know who just changed their professions altogether. I guess it’s pretty hard to be an architect-architect after all – actually produce projects and build buildings. Don’t think we are dying out – there are just too many of us for the current market. Plus, the financials of architecture are complicated, provided the difficulty of defining the “product” of architecture and why we charge this and not that for projects. All this makes a lot of us reconsider our professional trajectories, and some of us simply fail. Something to think about for some of us on the first day of school.

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